Cleveland: Full of History, Full of Hope

I’ve visited Cleveland several times over the years, but I never really saw Cleveland until my last visit. Cleveland has often been viewed as a pock-marked with “bad spots”, especially after the recession of 2008. But the city seems to be coming out of a metaphoric chrysalis as of late. You can really feel the city coming alive around you. To truly capture the essence of Cleveland, you’ve got to visit these places.

1. Algebra Tea House

This is a place where people come to interact and discuss religion and politics and art and poetry and love. Bookshelves line the wall amidst pops of color and hand crafted mugs. This little tea shop was the first non-italian owned shop in Cleveland’s Little Italy district and it has given and received warmth to the community with its tea and friendship.

algebra coffe shop

Everything has a touch of the owner’s hand– chairs, tables, and even the front door is crafted by him and his paintings hang on the walls in bright bursts of color.

2. Superman wasn’t born in Kansas or Iowa… He’s from Cleveland

That’s right! The original superhero, Superman, was conceptualized in a house near Case Western University by Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster. Like any iconic superhero, Superman is like a beacon of hope for mankind, shining bright and believing the best in us. It is fitting that a Man of Steel was born from the Cleveland community as Cleveland is finding its way again.

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The first volume of the Superman series is displayed in comic strip form on the fence surrounding Jerry Siegel’s house

3. Lucky’s Cafe

Craving a little Farm-to-Table action? Lucky’s is the place to be. Tradition and diversity lead the way in their most interesting of flavors. You can have fun with some of their more experimental dishes like the Canoewreck, or you can go with their Forever-Delicious Baked Mac-N-Cheese. Whatever you choose, I guarantee you’ll love it.

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Enjoy their outdoor seating in the warmer months!

4. Any one of the many Polish Catholic churches in the area

Poles came to Cleveland long ago and they brought their unique art form and food with them. Besides their delicious pierogis, some of the most stunning art is depicted in their churches–if you can find someone who works there to tell you the stories behind the different stained glass panels and gold leafed statues, it can be better than a trip to the museum. I personally went to St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Parma, OH where the minister walked me through his favorite panels and displays.

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A polish catholic church

5. Rockefeller Park aka Cleveland Cultural Gardens

Last but certainly not least, there’s Cleveland’s little slice of paradise. Cozied up against Lake Erie, I found this little gem on my way to the airport, right at the end of the trip. A string of 26 nationality gardens, the site is unique to Cleveland, with each garden sharing the flavor of its nation in the architecture and landscaping. It holds busts and full statues of notable individuals like Gandhi, Tesla, Curie, Schiller, and Shakespeare.

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Gandhi Statue at Cleveland Cultural Gardens

The theme of the Gardens “Peace through mutual understanding”, and the cultural diversity seen in the gardens stands at the very foundation of Cleveland and is a real joy to explore.


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Top 5 Books of 2016

Readers, open your books to page 394… May Alan Rickman rest in peace.

I read a grand total of 24 books this year and a lot of them were really good! More than can fit on this list, thankfully. Enjoy!

5. Hollow City by Random Riggs 

In the second installment of Missouri Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series, gives sophisticated topics a fresh point of view. Full grown adults, forever trapped in the bodies of their youth- how is maturity effected when you are living the same day over and over? And how quickly does that rose-tinted view of life last once thrust into the throes of war?

4. Muslim Girl by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh

If you haven’t already, read my review of here.

3. Muhammad: His life based on the earliest sources by Martin Ling

Lings drafts out a complete and thorough narrative of the story of the life of Prophet Muhammad through a variety of sources. Commonly, his story is told in fragments, so hearing the story of his life from birth to death made the man feel complete. I really enjoyed this listen from Audible. 

2. Heartless by Marissa Meyer 

See my raves of this wonderful book here.

1. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (R.I.P)

This haunting story of a man’s awakening was incredible. And I could listen to Tim Robbins’ reading it over and over again. Indeed, it is one of those books that leaves you with an eerie sense of incompleteness. You feel like you missed something very important the first time around because you were so engrossed in the plot. You want to go back and see if you can pinpoint what you’re looking for. A true classic, up there with Brave New World and 1984, Fahrenheit 451 is my top read of 2016.

Now it’s your turn, dear readers. What were your favorite books of the year? Tell me in the comments below!